Workshops

These workshops should be used as an idea for the Fall 2020-Winter 2021 workshops. Some workshops will remain the same, while others will change. There will be greater emphasis on developing leadership skills in the 2020-2021 program.

PDFs in the Faculty of Science receive world-class discipline-based scientific training. The aim of the professional development workshops is to provide complementary skills that are necessary to become a complete academic leader of the future, excelling in research, teaching and service. Each month, Program members will meet for a focused, 2-hour workshop led by a McMaster faculty expert or invited facilitators.

  1. Pedagogical research (John Dunlosky & Katherine Rawson, January 8)
    • This workshop will prepare Program Members to design a pedagogical research program (research design, considerations for working with humans, connections with discipline, data collection and analysis)
  1. How to prepare for the EXPLORE course (Ayesha Khan, January 15)
    • Ayesha Khan will describe what the EXPLORE course is, when proposals are due, and how to create an experiential learning plan.
  1. Meeting with Public Relations (Wade Hemsworth, January 29)
    • This workshop will prepare Program Members for how to write an Op/Ed article on the topic of their choice. Writing an Op/Ed will help members fine tune their communication skills by writing for a lay-audience about a complex topic. Op/Eds can be published on the McCall-MacBain program website and submitted to other publication outlets (The Sil, The Spec, etc.)
  1. Delivering powerful presentations Part 1: Organize and Structure the outline (Joe Kim, February 12)
    • Among the many different teaching strategies to consider, we can impact student learning by improving the organization and design of your presentations. Think about the ineffective lectures you have sat through as a student, researcher and instructor; lectures that lack organization, clarity, and engagement fail to connect with students. Students stop listening and turn to copying slides verbatim with little critical thinking. In this workshop, we will explore the cognitive constraints of attention and learning, learn how to organize critical content, and develop a cohesive story structure that connects with an audience.
  1. Invited Speaker - Dr. Daniel Goldreich (February 26)
  1. Delivering powerful presentations Part 2: Apply multimedia learning principles to slide design (Joe Kim, March 11)
    • Applying findings developed in controlled-lab and classroom-based studies can lead to improved slide design which translates into durable learning that extends from short-term tests to beyond the final exam. Building on the previous workshop in which we learned how to organize the lecture structure, we will next explore the underlying multimedia learning principles that guides good slide design. We will practice as we learn about redundancy, segmentation, signaling, and coherence. Together, these workshops will provide a practical plan for delivering lectures with a cohesive message.
  1. Invited Speaker - Dr. Bruce Wainman - What Have We Learned from 100 Years of Virtual Reality Education (March 25)
  1. Taking the Big 3 into the Classroom (Joe Kim, April 8)
    • The scientific study of human learning and memory consists of thousands of experiments dedicated to identifying cognitive processes fundamental to learning. The big three to emerge from the lab are spaced learning, interleaved practice and retrieval practice. The bigger question is how do I go about implementing these methods into my teaching? In this workshop, we will we will explore activities and exercises for implementing these methods into your classroom. We will also explore solutions for practical challenges to building durable learning.
  1. Invited Speaker - Dr. Karl Szpunar (April 22)
  1. Writing multiple choice questions to create effective tests (Joe Kim, May 6)
    • The primary goal of testing is to measure the extent to which students have learned the facts, concepts, procedures, and skills that have been taught in the course. In many university courses, instructors use multiple choice questions (MCQs) for some or all of the student assessment. However, many of the questions used by instructors contain critical flaws and most will do no more than test factual recall. Fortunately, writing high-quality MCQs is a learnable skill.The primary goal of testing is to measure the extent to which students have learned the facts, concepts, procedures, and skills that have been taught in the course. In many university courses, instructors use multiple choice questions (MCQs) for some or all of the student assessment. However, many of the questions used by instructors contain critical flaws and most will do no more than test factual recall. Fortunately, writing high-quality MCQs is a learnable skill.In this hands-on workshop, we will:
      • Learn about how to employ the best practices and avoid common pitfalls of writing measurably effective MCQs.
      • Explore how theories of learning such as Bloom’s revised taxonomy can help us determine the level at which a question should be written.
      • Practice writing MCQs and providing valuable feedback to peers.
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